Microsoft AZ-104 – Azure Admin Certification/Groups and Terraform

In a previous blog we talked about Azure AD and Tenant, Subscription, and User administration and how to map these functions to Terraform. In this blog we will continue this discussion but move onto Groups, IAM, and RBAC in Azure.

Groups are not only a good way to aggregate users but associate roles with users. Groups are the best way to associate roles and authorizations to users rather than associate them directly to a user. Dynamic groups are an extension of this but only available for Premium Azure AD and not the free layer.

Group types are Security and Microsoft 365. Security groups are typically associated with resource and role mappings to give users indirect association and responsibilities. The Microsoft 365 group provides mailbox, calendar, file sharing, and other Office 365 features to a user. This typically requires additional spend to get access to these resources while joining a security group typically does not cost anything.

Membership types are another group association that allows users to be an assigned member, a dynamic member, or a device to be a dynamic device. An example of a dynamic user would look at an attribute associated with a user and add them to a group. If, for example, someone lives in Europe they might be added to a GDPR group to host their data in a specific way that makes then GDPR compliant.

Role based access control or RBAC assign roles to a user or group to give them rights to perform specific functions. Some main roles in Azure are Global Administrator, User Administrator, or Billing Administrator. Traditional Azure roles include Owner, Contributor, Reader, or Administrator. Custom roles like backup admin or virtual machine admin can be added or created as desired to allow users to perform specific functions or job duties. Processes or virtual machines can be assigned RBAC responsibilities as well.

Groups are a relatively simple concept. You can create a Security or Microsoft 365 Group. The membership type can be Assigned, Dynamic, or Dynamic Device if those options are enabled. For corporate accounts they are typically enabled but for evaluation or personal accounts they are typically disabled.

Note that you have two group types but the Membership type is grey and defaults to Assigned. If you do a search in the azuread provider you can reference an azuread_group with data sources or create and manage an azuread_group with resources. For a data source azuread_group either name or object_id must be specified. For a resource azuread_group a name attribute is required but description and members are not mandatory. It is important to note that the group definition default to security group and there is no way to define a Microsoft 365 group through Terraform unless you load a custom personal provider select this option.

If you a search for group in the azurerm provider you get a variety of group definitions but most of these refer to the resource group and not groups associated with identity and authentication/authorization. Alternatively, groups can refer to storage groupings or sql groups for sql clusters. There are no group definitions like there were user definitions in the azurerm provider.

provider "azuread" {
}

resource "azuread_group" "simple_example" {
  name   = "Simple Example Group"
}

resource "azuread_user" "example" {
  display_name          = "J Doe"
  password              = "notSecure123"
  user_principal_name   = "jdoe@hashicorp.com"
}

resource "azuread_group" "example" {
  name    = "MyGroup"
  members = [
    azuread_user.example.object_id,
    /* more users */
  ]
}

data "azuread_group" "existing_example" {
  name = "Existing-Group"
}


resource "azuread_group_member" "example" {
  group_object_id   = azuread_group.example.id
  member_object_id  = data.azuread_user.example.id
}

In summary, group management from Terraform handles the standard use case for user and group management. Users can be created as a standard Azure AD user and associated with a Security group using the azuread_group_member resource. Existing groups can be declared with the data declaration or created with the resource declaration. Group members can be associated and deleted using Terraform. Not all the group functionality that exists in Azure is replicated in Terraform but for the typical use case all functionality exists. Best practice would suggest to do group associations and user definitions outside of Terraform using scripting. Terraform can call these scripts using local-exec commands rather than trying to make everything work inside of Terraform declarations.

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